Common Places: Printing, Embroidery, and the Art of Global Mapping

Ahmanson Building, Level 2
February 18, 2012–September 23, 2012
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Common Places features three objects from the museum's permanent collection which transform printed works on paper into one-of-a-kind embroideries: a seventeenth-century valance, a cigarette silks quilt, and Alighiero Boetti’s Mappa.

Mappa (1979), is a work conceptualized by Italian artist Alighiero Boetti and embroidered by Afghan women, which takes the geopolitical map as its subject. Beginning in 1971, Boetti’s embroidered world maps were produced serially in Kabul until the Soviet invasion in 1979; thereafter, production shifted to Afghan refugee camps in Peshawar, Pakistan.

The textiles presented in the exhibition, including Boetti's work, articulate contemporary aspects of global phenomena and suggest that far from being a recent development, globalization has deep historical roots that extended into the home and everyday life.

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Image: Alighiero Boetti, Mappa, Italy, 1979, cotton embroidery floss, Purchased with funds provided by The Broad Contemporary Art Museum Foundation in honor of the museum's 40th anniversary, Museum Associates © 2011.

Collaboration in a Transnational Artistic Network

The exhibition Common Places: Printing, Embroidery, and the Art of Global Mapping features embroidered objects with global themes, inspired by works on paper. Included in the exhibition is LACMA’s Mappa (1979), a work conceptualized by Italian artist Alighiero Boetti and embroidered by Afghan women, which takes the geopolitical map as its subject. rom 1971, Boetti’s embroidered world maps were produced serially in Kabul until the Soviet invasion in 1979; thereafter, production shifted to Afghan refugee camps in Peshawar, Pakistan, where it continued until Boetti’s death...